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Dracula Untold. Starring Luke Evans and Sarah Gadon. Directed by Gary Shore. Running time: 92 minutes. MPAA rating: PG-13.

Before seeing Dracula Untold, you'd do well to take everything you know about Bram Stoker's iconic character and throw it out the highest window. While you're at it, chuck whatever you know about Vlad Tepes, the Wallachian prince whose exploits have long been thought, erroneously, to have inspired Stoker's Dracula. For good measure, forget everything you know about Caligula, although he's credited here simply as "Master Vampire." Yes, Vlad the Impaler (Luke Evans), ruler of Transylvania (ugh), was turned into a vampire by undead Caligula (Charles Dance). As an origin story, this is slightly less loony than the one offered by Dracula 2000, which posited that Dracula was actually Judas Iscariot.

Over and over again we get sympathetic humanist rewrites of Dracula, who as conceived by Stoker was just straight-up evil walking, a symbol of Victorian English mores threatened by Slavic depravity. Dracula Untold gives us Vlad the Impaler as a generally nice guy -- the Impaler! Nice guy! -- who loves his wife and his young son, and who only impales his defeated foes to scare off the Turks, whose army far outnumbers Vlad's. The Turks demand a thousand Transylvanian boys for service in their army, so Vlad heads off to a cave, where Caligula the old vampire hangs out waiting for someone to take over for him. Caligula rather generously allows Vlad a three-day trial period as a vampire. "Try it out for a while," Caligula says in the funnier, more interesting movie in my head. "See how you like it."

Vlad likes it. He can become a cloud of bats that destroy a bunch of Turks. He can remotely conduct another cloud of bats to destroy more Turks, at one point making them into a giant fist. The only problems are that he needs blood, and that sunlight and silver aren't good for him. So essentially Dracula has been refashioned as a supernatural superhero, one who might be part of Universal's proposed "shared universe" of monsters. It's as bloodless as a superhero movie, too; this film about the king of vampires boasts less gore than a typical Vampire Diaries episode, and the combat scenes are likewise dry and dull. First-time feature director Gary Shore, who has a background in commercials, apes Peter Jackson's sweeping battlefield camerawork without Jackson's sense of strategy, timing, or drama. It's just a bunch of nonexistent people getting knocked over by nonexistent bats.

Dracula Untold isn't openly offensive, so I mainly let it wash over me in a wave of blandness until it was done. It doesn't risk anything; it has no camp, no humor, little in the way of sex. It seems to have been made to appease an imaginary audience of mocking teenagers, who will find nothing here to fuel their fun. It had the odd effect of making me look back on a previous Universal monster mash, the miserable Van Helsing, with a degree of fondness; its Dracula was played with efflorescent wit by Richard Roxburgh, who knew how to do it -- play with the accent as though it were taffy, and be more arch than a roomful of drag queens. Luke Evans favors us with that time-honored trope the humble great warrior, and fights his bloodlust even when his own wife offers her neck. The untold Dracula here is a really boring guy who runs into a vampiric Roman emperor and becomes a really boring vampire. Based on what the movie has to tell us, I'd rather have seen Caligula Untold.



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